Turning Pain into Purpose: The Role of Behavioral Health Specialists in Decreasing Police Brutality and Police Killings of Unarmed African Americans

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Turning Pain into Purpose: The Role of Behavioral Health Specialists in Decreasing Police Brutality and Police Killings of Unarmed African Americans

November 4 @ 1:00 pm 4:00 pm CDT

The Story of George Floyd, Philonise Floyd

On June 20, 1981, Philonise O’Neil Floyd, was the fourth child born to the late, Mrs. Larcenia “Ms. Cissy” Jones on Fort Hood army base. Raised in the Third Ward area of Houston, Texas. He attended Jack Yates High School and Texas Southern University pursuing a degree in Criminal Justice. In 2014, Floyd started his professional driving career with C. R. England one of the nation’s largest refrigerated carriers; later accepted a position with W. M. Dewy and Son, Inc. hauling custom pipes to their specific destinations.

On May 26, 2020, Floyd learned that his older brother, George “Perry” Floyd, Jr. had been murdered by four police officers in Minneapolis after a store clerk alleged that he passed a counterfeit $20 bill. The world watched as named officer, Derek Chauvin knelt on Floyd’s neck for 8 minutes and 46 seconds.

Across the United States and internationally, George’s death sparked a world-wide outpour of protests against police brutality, especially toward black people. The day after laying George to rest, June 10, 2020, Philonise testified before United States Congress urging them to “Do the right thing” by passing the Justice in Police Act of 2020 barring choke holds, creating a registry to track officers with serious misconduct records, and lift certain legal protections that now makes it hard to go after officers in court for using excessive force.

Philonise’s life as a professional transporter drastically changed forever. Floyd vowed that George’s death would not be in vain; another hashtag on a t-shirt, and begun to tirelessly advocate to change systematic racism and the challenges faced due to police injustice that has for over 400 years led to the harassment and killing of African Americans at the hands of police.

The Philonise and Keeta Floyd Institute for Social Change key principals are to advocate for all children, young-adults, and families nation-wide by actively working to eliminate the daily impacts of police brutality, criminal justice reform and systemic racism. They aim to find solutions to the countless challenges and pressing issues faced through injustice. They believe that by actively working in communities to design innovative programs to eliminate the ongoing barriers faced due to social issues. They vowed to will work diligently alongside city, and state government officials helping to look at interventions that can lead to long-term, sustainability, while also cultivating public policies, diversity, equality and launching a bold social research program. They promote transparency and are globally committed to influence change and put an end to this generational fight for inclusion; “this is a movement, and not a moment in time!”.

The mission of The Philonise and Keeta Floyd Institute for Social Change is to advance awareness, advocacy and promote stability within global communities to support the protection of human rights through a commitment to social justice, equity-focused reforms, and eradicating systemic racism. They have turned their pain into action.

Schedule 

1 – 2 pm

  • Review the Story of George Floyd – 20 minutes
  • Learn about George Floyd as person and describe any behavioral health issues including help received if any
  • Describe the day when day he encountered police
  • 40 minutes – Questions from the audience will be moderated by MIMH host, Kelly Gregory

Presenter, Mark Sanders

Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, is an international speaker, trainer, and consultant in the behavioral health field whose work has reached thousands throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, Caribbean and British Islands.

Mark is the author of five books, which focus on behavioral health. Recent writings include Slipping through the Cracks: Intervention Strategies for Clients Multiple Addictions and Disorders, Recovery Management: and Relationship Detox: Helping Clients Develop Healthy Relationships in Recovery. He has had two stories published in the New York Times best-selling books series, Chicken Soup for the Soul. Mark has been a certified addictions counselor for 34 years. He has received numerous awards including a Life Time Achievement Award from the Illinois Addiction Counselor Certification Board and the Barbara Bacon Award for outstanding contributions to the Social Work profession as a Loyola University of Chicago Alumni.

Mark is co-founder of Serenity Academy of Chicago, the only recovery high school in Illinois. He is past president of the board of the Illinois Chapter of NAADAC. He has had a 30 year career as a university educator having taught at the University of Chicago, Illinois State University, Illinois School of Professional Psychology, and Loyola University of Chicago, School of Social Work.

Description

Politicians, the clergy, the media, criminal justice specialists, legal specialists and concerned citizens have weighed-in on how to decrease police-related violence. We have yet to hear from the Behavioral Health Profession. This presentation will begin with a historical perspective on police brutality and police killings of unarmed African Americans. We will identify behavioral health strategies to decrease police-related violence. A 14-point strategy for decreasing police killings of unarmed African Americans will also be discussed.

Schedule 

2 – 4 pm

  • Introductions and objectives for Mark Sanders presentation
  • A Historical Perspective
  • The role of behavioral health specialists in reducing police brutality and police killings of unarmed African Americans
  • A 14-point plan to reduce police killings of unarmed African Americans

4:00 pm

  • Adjourn

Objectives

By the end of this presentation participants will be able to:

  • Articulate the history of police brutality directed towards African Americans
  • Identify the role of behavioral health specialists in reducing police brutality and police killings of unarmed African Americans
  • Utilize a 14-point plan to reduce police killings of unarmed African Americans
$149