Category: Media

Take Charge Training: Exercise and Nutrition for Individuals with Mental Illness

Individuals with mental illness die an average of 25 years younger than the general population. Often these early deaths are attributable to medical factors such as diabetes, heart disease, and hypertension. These other medical factors can be prevented and/or managed with the implementation of good nutritional habits and proper exercise. In this training, Ms. Kincade takes us through the experiences of the Independence Center in St. Louis which set up a Wellness Program for its members. She discusses the challenges faced in various settings–the mental health center, the home and the community–while trying to help people develop good habits, and several practical tips and solutions.

Sustaining Appropriate Clinical Boundaries in Home and Community Care

Due to the home and community-based location of their work, community support staff and other in-home care providers have unique challenges in maintaining appropriate clinical boundaries with their clients. In this training, Jan Heumann explores numerous potential pitfalls that can en- snare well-meaning professionals. The Code of Ethics for Psychiatric Rehabilitation Practitioners is used to demonstrate how an ethics code can be beneficial in guiding practice.

Suicide in the Military

After losing one son to suicide and another in combat within eight months of each other, Major General Graham made it his mission to help prevent other families from facing the same sort of tragedies. Together with his wife, Carol, and his daughter, Melanie, Major General Graham works to raise awareness about untreated depression in the military and the rising number of military suicides. The Grahams have become advocates for soldiers who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and other mental health illnesses. In this DVD, Major General Graham will share his personal story of loss and relate how his family is leading the fight to reduce military suicides.

Suicide Among African American Teens and Young Adults – A Discussion for People In A Position To Help

Stigma often prevents individuals from gaining awareness and understanding of suicide. Talking candidly about suicide with parents and caregivers can be difficult barrier to overcome when cultural stigma exist. Common misconceptions or cultural beliefs discourage many from seeking treatment, and many educators and individuals in helping professions are not convinced that suicide is a genuine health concern for African American communities. This educational training aims to raise awareness and understanding of suicidal behavior among African American adolescents (ages 14-24 years), as well as to provide individuals with strategies and resources to appropriately intervene with a young person considering suicide.

Purposes, Principles and Functions of the Strength-Based, Person-Centered Approach to Community Mental Health

Dr. Kisthardt highlights key concepts that serve to guide and direct strengths‐based, person- centered case management. These include the promotion of normal interdependence, citizenship, partnership, mutual expectations, reciprocity, collaboration and shareddecision making. He will also share alternative concepts for the traditional understanding of “motivation”, “problem”, and “change.” Through this training, Dr. Kisthardt hopes that you will gain a deeper understanding of the key concepts related to the purpose of helping in strengths‐based case management, and learn the particulars of the Strengths Assessment and how to effectively utilize it in your work with people.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Family’s Perspective

Mr. Bahr, founder of the St. Louis OCD Support group discusses his process of identifying and utilizing a system of support for his son who was diagnosed at an early age with OCD. This process involved educating himself and his family, educating the public, and guiding families and clients to seek information, and treatment resources within their communities.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Client’s Perspective

Discussion in this training focuses on Ms. Tarter’s experience of OCD. This experience involves a repetitive cycle of overwhelming obsessions that causes great anxiety and elicits her attempts to decrease this anxiety through the use of rituals that are only briefly satisfying in decreasing the anxiety. Ms Tarter explains that there is no cure for OCD and iterates the idea that folks must learn how to cope with the illness through techniques such as controlled breathing, the use of coping statements, tactile strategies and finally, medication.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: A Clinical Intervention

OCD is characterized by the experience of obsessions and compulsions that greatly affect the quality of an individual’s life. Obsessions are thoughts, feelings, and urges that result in great discomfort. Compulsions are the strategies that people use to decrease or neutralize discomfort experienced by the obsessions. In order to meet the criteria for a diagnosis of OCD, a person must spend 1 hour a day in either mental or behavioral ritual or the obsession must cause great distress and/or it must cause significant problems in their life. Furthermore, OCD has an impact of the individual’s family and other systems of support.In this video, Mr. Mitchell describes Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and identifies the criteria for its diagnosis. In addition, Mr. Mitchell describes how OCD is manifested in behavior and identifies treatment options for the disorder. Further discussion centers on how family and other support systems are affected by the person with OCD.

Multicultural Competence

In this presentation on Multicultural Competence, Dr. Vetta Thompson discusses various concepts such as multicultural awareness and competence, diversity, acculturation and assimilation relative to the assessment and delivery of services to mental health clients.

Introduction to Traumatic Brain Injury

There are very few injuries or medical conditions that can impact every aspect of a person. Brain injury does not just impact the individual, it impacts their family members and their loved ones. Learn the prevalence, causes, and consequences of traumatic brain injury as well as diagnosis and treatment options.

History of the Treatment of People with Mental Illness in Missouri

This module will talk about early mental health care centers in the state of Missouri including State Hospital Number One in Fulton, the St. Louis County Insane Asylum, and the Saint Louis Hospital for Social Evils. The history of these hospitals, the treatments offered patients, and the management of people with mental illness as affected by social and medical movements form the core of this presentation.

Helping Children with Functional Pain

Many children suffer from recurrent or chronic pain that is not due to a medical problem. This type of pain is referred to as functional pain. The most common types of functional pain reported by children are recurrent stomachaches and headaches. The cost of functional pain is considerable. Children with functional pain make frequent doctor visits and are often referred to tertiary care facilities. In addition, several hundred thousand school days are lost each month as a result of functional pain and school absences can negatively impact a child’s academic and social development. A number of psychological interventions have been found to be highly effective in decreasing the frequency, duration, and intensity of pain episodes. Nevertheless, it can be difficult for families to access effective treatment.

Frontline Ethics: Issues in Mental Health and Substance Abuse Counseling

Ethical issues and dilemmas challenge the practitioner. What are the guiding principles that inform ethical decision-making? How do the codes of ethics under which clinicians practice fit with the guiding principles? This interactive workshop focuses on the use of the guiding principles, the codes of ethics, and practice applications.

Evidence-Based Prevention Programs: What Works

Dr. Sale discusses her work evaluating evidence-based prevention programs on a statewide and national basis, and reviews elements of effective programs.